Dr. Katie Beleznay

Vancouver Skin Care Specialist

Dr. Katie Beleznay is a leading medical and cosmetic dermatologist specializing in the latest treatments to repair and rejuvenate the skin

Boardroom Botox: Can Cosmetic Procedures Boost Your Career?

The following Q&A was conducted with The Kit for an article that was published in October 2018.

1. When did you first notice an increase in patients electing to have procedures done because of their careers? Were you surprised at first? And how common is it now?

Looking younger and feeling better about their appearance are common reasons patients give as to why they are choosing to have cosmetic procedures and these directly or indirectly impact both their personal and professional lives. So I don't think having procedures done for career benefits is a wholly new phenomenon but rather it is becoming more top of mind for patients when they discuss their motivations. I don't see that many patients that I would say are doing cosmetic treatments solely for career reasons, but for some it may be the impetus ie. applying for a new job or wanting to look and feel on top of their game. Feeling and looking good can of course impact confidence and studies have shown that both appearance and confidence can impact job opportunity, promotion etc.

2. What are some of the things patients routinely say to you about why they’re having something done/why it’s so important?  Has anyone told you they actually felt pressure or faced comments at work that made them worry about looking older?

I have had patients who have shared personal experiences where they felt that appearing younger provided them an advantage in a business setting. And even if it is simply a matter of feeling more confident, that alone can be a major career benefit. I had one patient where in her company the people all being hired around her were younger and she felt some pressure to fit in.  For others it’s more about maintenance and prevention, so not so much about wanting to look younger, but rather wanting to work on steps to maintain healthy skin. Sometimes there is a driving force like they got their passport photo after 10 years and were surprised at the changes since their last photo or they have an upcoming high school reunion or wedding.

3. What is driving this phenomenon? Are people under more pressure to look younger in general, but especially in the context of work/career?

I think that some people express a desire (or feel pressure) to look younger, but it has also become more acceptable to talk about that and to act on it. Coupled with that is the fact that cosmetic procedures have become more mainstream thanks in large part to the many non-invasive options that require very little down time (away from work) and the open discussion and wealth of information about options on social media. People are constantly seeing before and after photos of people after various treatments and all the information about the different options is quite accessible.  I had one patient say … she invests in nice clothes and purses, she dyes her hair every 6 weeks, and she started to realize that if she’s spending so much on that, she wanted to also invest in her face to make sure she is doing what she can to keep things looking healthy and vibrant. Even though there is often a request to “look younger” I try not to focus on “anti-aging”, but rather review specific personal goals to help people feel great and look and feel rejuvenated whatever their age. 

4. Around what age do people tend to start coming to you with career-related concerns? Does it differ for men and women? What’s the youngest you’ve seen people start worrying about looking older on the job?

It varies quite a bit and really depends on the industry. For example those in the entertainment industry may start earlier. I do have patients in their 20s who see me for small treatments simply to maintain their appearance and slow down signs of aging. In fact, starting small doses of "preventative" botox early can save you from needing more significant treatments down the road.

5. What do women and men typically have done? And how does this tend to evolve over the years (for example, might someone start with Botox in their 40s, then begin adding treatments as they age?)

When people start out they may focus on their skin and developing a personalized skin care plan that is preventative and can help give the skin a little glow. Those with concerns like sun spots or redness may consider a laser or light based treatment to help. Botox and filler have become increasingly popular. They are non-invasive and there is increasing evidence on their ability to not only improve appearance, but also prevent signs of aging over time, and there has been a renewed focus on natural looking outcomes.

In terms of what options are best at which age, it has less to do with age and really is patient-specific i.e. some people in their 20s may have deep frown line and conversely someone in their 60s may not and may focus on other things such as skin tightening or body sculpting. Similarly some patients genetically may be prone to a double chin (at any age) and they may consider an injectable like Belkyra to help reduce that.

6. What are some of the most popular options out there now?

The popular options vary depending on individual patient needs. Complexion enhancing treatments are always popular, so for example IPL to help remove brown spots and reduce redness or microneedling that can stimulate collagen production and help smooth out skin and minimize the appearance of pore size and acne scars. Neuromodulators such as botox are extremely popular and can help soften lines and wrinkles in different areas of the face. Fillers can provide a little lift to help with sagging skin and can be done conservatively for a natural looking outcome. CoolSculpting is quite popular as an option to permanently reduce pockets of fat. There are many other treatments available and I like to review the patient’s main goals for treatment.

There are always new treatments in this field.  Belkrya, which we have been using to reduce the fat in the double chin area, is now commonly being used in other areas. One area we are more frequently treating is the jowls to help contour along the jawline. 

We are also more frequently seeing people for treatment of their necks. One common concern is necklace lines, so called “tech neck”. These lines may be increasingly seen from looking down at computers or phone. SkinBoosters or Volite (both a hyaluronic acid solution) can help to soften those lines. Volite is new to the market in North America, but has been available in Europe and popular there. It is an innovative injectable designed to improve skin quality and help with hydration and elasticity and is commonly used on the face and décolletage. 

If you’re interested to learn more about cosmetic treatments, contact us to book a consultation.